27th January Birthdays today: Mimi Rogers, Nick Mason, Alan Cumming, Tracy Lawrence and Bridget Fonda

Birthdays : January 27th

Tracy Lawrence

From Wikipedia
Tracy Lawrence
CountrySingerTracyLawrence.jpg
Background information
Born January 27, 1968 (age 45)
Atlanta, TexasUS[1]
Origin Foreman, ArkansasUS[2]
Genres Country
Occupations Singer-songwriter
Instruments Vocals
Acoustic guitar
Years active 1991–present
Labels Atlantic
Warner Bros.
DreamWorks Nashville
Mercury Nashville
Rocky Comfort
BamaJam, Lawrence Music Group
Associated acts Flip Anderson, Larry Boone,Kenny ChesneyTim McGraw,James StroudElbert West
Website http://www.tracylawrence.com

Tracy Lawrence (born January 27, 1968) is an American country music artist. He started at a country music restaurant called “Live At Libby’s” where owner Libby Knight would help local talent find their way into country music. Lawerence signed to Atlantic Records in 1991, Lawrence debuted that year with the album Sticks and Stones, which produced his first chart single and first Number One hit in its title track.[2] Five more studio albums, as well as a live album and a compilation album, followed throughout the 1990s and into 2000 on Atlantic before the label’s country division was closed in 2001. Afterward, he recorded for Warner Bros. RecordsDreamWorks RecordsMercury Records Nashville and his own label, Rocky Comfort Records.

Lawrence has released nine studio albums, three compilations, a live album, and a Christmas album. His studio albums have accounted for more than thirty singles on the Billboard country music charts. Of these, eight have reached number one: “Sticks and Stones” (1991), “Alibis“, “Can’t Break It to My Heart“, “My Second Home” (all 1993), “If the Good Die Young” (1994), “Texas Tornado” (1995), “Time Marches On” (1996) and “Find Out Who Your Friends Are” (2006).[2]

 

Biography

Tracy Lawrence was born in Atlanta, Texas, and lived most of his early life in Foreman, Arkansas. He wrote his first song when he was four years old. His mother had to write down the lyrics for him. He played in his first band at the age of sixteen and later attended Southern Arkansas University in Magnolia, Arkansas, where he was a member of the Epsilon Kappa chapter of Sigma Pi Fraternity. In 1990 Lawrence left Arkansas for Nashville, Tennessee where he planned to find success as a recording artist.[1]

Lawrence worked as an ironworker and in phone sales while he tried to break into the music business. He began participating in talent shows and earned enough money to live on. He began working with Wanda Collier, a music publisher, doing some shows and co-writing some songs, while learning his way around the music scene in Nashville. He had a gig at the Bluebird Cafe and met Wayne Edwards who became his manager.

Musical career

1991-1993: Sticks and Stones and robbery

With Edwards’ assistance, Lawrence signed with Atlantic Records and began recording his first album Sticks and Stones. On May 31, 1991, before the album’s release, Lawrence walked his former girlfriend to the door of her hotel room and was confronted by three armed men. The men robbed them and attempted to force Lawrence and his friend into her motel room. Lawrence resisted and was shot four times, allowing his friend to escape. Two of the wounds were major and necessitated surgery. One of the bullets remains embedded in Lawrence’s pelvis.[1]

Sticks and Stones, upon its late-1991 release, accounted for four singles on the Billboard country charts. First was the album’s title track, which spent a week at Number One in January 1992.[2] Following it were, in order: “Today’s Lonely Fool“, “Runnin’ Behind” and “Somebody Paints the Wall.”[2] Sticks and Stones was also certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America for shipments of one million copies. In 1992, he was also named by Billboard as Top New Male Vocalist.

1993-1994: Alibis

His second album, Alibis, also produced four singles. The first of these, which was the title track, was his second number-one, as well as his first entry on the Billboard Hot 100, where it peaked at number 72. After this song came “Can’t Break It to My Heart“, “My Second Home” and “If the Good Die Young“, all of which went to number-one.[1] The album was certified 2× Multi-Platinum by the RIAA. In 1994, he contributed the song “Renegades, Rebels, and Rogues” to the soundtrack of the film Maverick.[1] This song became a Top Ten hit for him as well, and in 1993, he was awarded as Top New Male Vocalist by the Academy of Country Music.

1994-1995: I See It Now

Lawrence’s third album, the platinum-certified I See It Now, produced two consecutive number 2 hits in its title track and “As Any Fool Can See“, the former of which was a number 84 on the Hot 100. The Bobby Braddock-penned “Texas Tornado” became his sixth number-one hit in mid-1995, followed by another number 2 in “If the World Had a Front Porch“.[2] Later in 1995, he released a live acoustic album, Tracy Lawrence Live and Unplugged.[1]

1995-1997: Time Marches On

Time Marches On, his fourth album, was released in 1996. Its lead-off single was “If You Loved Me“, which reached a peak of number 4 in early 1996.[2] Following this song was Lawrence’s longest-lasting number-one hit, “Time Marches On“, also written by Braddock.[2] After this song came “Stars over Texas” and “Is That a Tear“, both peaking at number 2.[2] Time Marches On was certified double platinum by the RIAA.

1997-1998: The Coast Is Clear and charges

Lawrence’s fifth studio album, The Coast Is Clear, was issued in 1997. This album produced consecutive Top Five hits in the No. 2 “Better Man, Better Off” and No. 4 “How a Cowgirl Says Goodbye“.[2] The title track, however, became the first single of his career to miss Top Ten, peaking at No. 26, and the final single, “While You Sleep”, fell short of Top 40.[2] Nonetheless, The Coast Is Clear was certified gold.

In March 1997, Lawrence married his 2nd wife Stacie Drew, a Dallas Cowboys cheerleader. By December she had filed charges against him. He was eventually convicted of misdemeanor battery and suspended by his record label until he got “his personal matters straight.” He was ordered to pay a $500 fine to a women’s shelter in Las Vegas.[1][3]

1999-2002: Lessons Learned and Tracy Lawrence

In late 1999-early 2000, Lawrence returned to the charts with “Lessons Learned“.[1] This was the title track to his sixth album, 2000’s Lessons Learned. “Lessons Learned” was Lawrence’s only Top 40 hit on the pop charts, peaking at number 40 there. Despite this single’s success, however, the other singles from the album (“Lonely” and “Unforgiven”) did not peak as highly, reaching number 18 and number 35 respectively.[2] By the end of 2000, Atlantic closed its Nashville division, and several acts on its roster, including Lawrence, were transferred to Warner Bros. Records. His only release for that label, Tracy Lawrence, produced only two low-charting singles in “Life Don’t Have to Be So Hard” and “What a Memory” before he exited the label.[1]

2003-2004: Strong

Lawrence did not chart again until late 2003 with the release of “Paint Me a Birmingham“. This song, which had also been a number 53-peaking single for Ken Mellons earlier that year, went on to peak at number 4 for Lawrence in early 2004.[2] It was the first release from Strong, his only album for DreamWorks Records.[1] Following this song were “It’s All How You Look at It” and “Sawdust on Her Halo”, at number 36 and number 48 respectively.[2]

2005-2006: Label change and Then & Now: The Hits Collection

Lawrence transferred to Mercury Nashville in 2005, where he released the compilation Then & Now: The Hits Collection. His only release for the label, this album included fifteen of his previous hits, all of which (except “Paint Me a Birmingham”) had to be newly recorded as the label did not own the rights to his Warner Bros. and Atlantic releases.[4] Two new tracks were included as well: “Used to the Pain”, previously a single in 1998 for its co-writer, Mark Nesler, and “If I Don’t Make It Back”. These two new songs were both issued as singles, but after the release of the latter, Lawrence exited Mercury’s roster.

2006-2008: Business ventures and For the Love

Lawrence signs an autograph for a sailor aboard the USS Enterprise (CVN-65), May 2007

In 2006, Lawrence started his own record label, Rocky Comfort Records. A partnership with his manager and brother, Laney, Rocky Comfort operates as a joint venture with CO5 Nashville. His first single for the label was “Find Out Who Your Friends Are“, which was released in August 2006 from his album For the Love. This song did not enter Top 40 on the country charts until January 2007, when the album was released, and in June of the same year, it became his first Number One in eleven years.[2][5] The song reached the top of the country charts in its forty-first week, setting a new record for the slowest-climbing Number One country single, and the second-slowest on any Billboard singles chart.[5] It was also the first time that any artist had reached Number One with the first release from a self-owned label. The song’s chart performance was aided by an alternate recording on the album which featured guest vocals from Tim McGraw and Kenny Chesney, although only Lawrence was credited on the charts. The re-recorded version received Musical Event of the Year honors at the 2007 CMA Awards, Lawrence’s first award from that association.[6] Following this song was “Til I Was a Daddy Too” at No. 32, and “You Can’t Hide Redneck”, the third single.[2] Shortly before the latter, Lawrence also issued a Christmas album entitled All Wrapped Up in Christmas, the title track of which peaked at No. 57 based on Christmas season airplay. Chad Brock and Zona Jones also signed to the Rocky Comfort label,[7] although Brock never released anything for it.

2009: The Rock

Lawrence released the single “Up to Him” in early 2009. This is the first single for a studio album entitled The Rock, which was released in June 2009. The album is composed entirely of Christian music and has been nominated for a Grammy in the best southern, country or bluegrass gospel album category.

2011: The Singer

Lawrence released the single “The Singer” in 2011. It is the title track to his eleventh studio album, released on June 7, 2011. The album’s second single, “Pills,” was released in 2012.

2013: Headlights, Taillights and Radios

Lawrence released the single “Stop, Drop & Roll” to country radio in October 2012.[8] It is the first single from his album Headlights, Taillights and Radios, released on August 20, 2013.[9] The album’s second single, “Footprints on the Moon”, was released on June 17, 2013.

Mimi Rogers

Miriam “Mimi” Rogers (née Spickler; born January 27, 1956) is an American film and television actress, producer and competitive poker player. Her notable film roles include Gung Ho (1986), Someone to Watch Over Me (1987), and Desperate Hours (1990). She garnered the greatest acclaim of her career for her role in the religious drama, The Rapture (1991), with critic Robin Wood applauding that she “gave one of the greatest performances in the history of the Hollywood cinema.”[1]Rogers has since appeared in Reflections on a Crime (1994), The Mirror Has Two Faces (1996), Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery (1997), Lost in Space (1998), Ginger Snaps (2000), The Door in the Floor (2004), and For a Good Time, Call… (2012). Her extensive work in television includes Paper Dolls (1984), Weapons of Mass Distraction (1997), The Loop (2006–2007), and recurring roles on The X-Files (1998–1999) and Two and a Half Men (2011–present)

Early life

Rogers was born Miriam Spickler at General Hospital in Coral Gables, Florida. Her father is Philip C. Spickler, a civil engineer.[2][3] Her mother, Teri Berwick, was a former dance and drama major.[2] Her father was Jewish and her mother wasEpiscopalian.[4] Her father had become involved with Scientology before she was born, and the religion was part of her upbringing.[4][5]

The family lived in VirginiaArizonaMichigan, and England, before settling in Los Angeles. She attended accelerated schools and graduated from high school at age 14. In place of college, she formulated her own program of study and also got involved in community theater and writing.[2] Rogers later worked in a hospital for incapacitated patients outside Palo Alto, California and for six years she was a part-time social worker, involved in substance-abuse counseling.[2]

At the beginning of their acting careers, Rogers and Kirstie Alley lived together.[6]

 

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Nick Mason

From Wikipedia
Nick Mason
Nick Mason cropped.jpg

Nick Mason in 2004
Background information
Birth name Nicholas Berkeley Mason
Born 27 January 1944 (age 69)
Edgbaston, Birmingham, England
Genres Progressive rockpsychedelic rock,experimental rockinstrumental rock
Occupations Musician, drummer, record producer, author, auto racer
Instruments Drums, percussion, keyboards, guitar, vocals
Years active 1964–present
Labels CapitolColumbiaSonyEMI,Harvest
Associated acts Pink Floyd, Sigma 6, The Screaming Abdabs, The Tea Set, Mason & FennRobert WyattCarla Bley,Michael Mantler

Nicholas Berkeley “Nick” Mason (born 27 January 1944) is an English drummer and composer, best known for his work with Pink Floyd. He is the only constant member of the band since its formation in 1965. Despite solely writing only a few Pink Floyd songs, Mason has co-written some of Pink Floyd’s most popular compositions such as “Echoes” and “Time“.

Mason is the only Pink Floyd member to be featured on every one of their albums. It is estimated that as of 2010, the group have sold over 250 million records worldwide,[1][2] including 74.5 million units sold in the United States.

He competes in auto racing events, such as the 24 Hours of Le Mans.[3]

On 26 November 2012, Mason received an Honorary Doctor of Letters from the University of Westminster at the presentation ceremony of the School of Architecture and Built Environment (he had studied architecture at the University’s predecessor, Regent Street Polytechnic, 1962–1967).[4]

 

Early life

The son of the documentary film maker Bill Mason, he was born in Birmingham but brought up in Hampstead, London (many online biographies mistakenly cite the street address Downshire Hill – sometimes as “the Downshire Hills” – as a district of Birmingham), and attended Frensham Heights School, near Farnham, Surrey. He later studied at the Regent Street Polytechnic (now the University of Westminster), where he teamed up with Roger WatersBob Klose and Richard Wright in 1964 to form Pink Floyd’s predecessor, Sigma 6.

Musical career

Mason has been the drummer on every Pink Floyd album[5] (but not on every song; some feature session drummers and drum machines).[5]

The only Pink Floyd songs that are solely credited to Mason are “The Grand Vizier’s Garden Party Parts 1–3” (from Ummagumma) and “Speak to Me” (from The Dark Side of the Moon).[5] The one-off song by the band titled “Nick’s Boogie” was named after him.[5]

The only times Mason’s voice has been included on Pink Floyd’s albums are “Corporal Clegg“, the single spoken line in “One of These Days” and spoken parts of “Signs of Life” and “Learning to Fly” (the latter taken from actual recording of Mason’s first solo flight) from A Momentary Lapse of Reason.[5] He does, however, sing lead vocals on two unreleased but heavily bootlegged tracks, “Scream Thy Last Scream” (1967) and “The Merry Xmas Song” (1975–76). In live performances of the song “Sheep“, he did the spoken section.[5]

Despite legal conflicts over ownership of the name ‘Pink Floyd’, which began when Waters left the group in 1986 and lasted roughly seven years, Waters and Nick Mason are now on good terms.[5] Mason joined Waters on the last two nights of his 2002 world tour to play drums on the Pink Floyd song “Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun“, and he also played drums on some concerts of Waters’ European tour in 2006, and during performances in Los Angeles and New York City in the United States. On 12 May 2007, Mason joined Waters again on stage at Earls Court to play The Dark Side of the Moon. Again, on 12 May 2011, Mason was featured, along with David Gilmour, on the encore “Outside the Wall” at a concert by Waters, who was performing The Wall in its entirety. Gilmour also performed on “Comfortably Numb” that night.

In July 2005, Mason, Gilmour, Wright, and Waters played together on stage for the first time in 24 years.[5] A four-song set was played at the Live 8 concert in London.[5] Mason also joined Gilmour and Wright for the encore during Gilmour’s show at the Royal Albert Hall, London, on 31 May 2006, reuniting the post-Waters Pink Floyd. Mason has also claimed to be the link between Gilmour and Waters, and believes the band will play live again, mentioning the possibility of “playing again for a charitable cause” or even “a tour” in various interviews in the last few years. He also stated in 2006 that Pink Floyd have not officially disbanded yet.

Unlike the other members of Pink Floyd, Mason has rarely played an instrument other than his drum kit, although he has contributed sound effects to many Pink Floyd albums. He has only ever played non-percussive instruments on “The Grand Vizier’s Garden Party”, his personal composition from Ummagumma, where he provided some keyboard, guitar and bass noises, and on live versions of “Outside the Wall”, where he played acoustic guitar along with the rest of the band. However, on the Profiles album Mason released with Rick Fenn in 1985, he is also credited with keyboards.[6] He can be seen playing a synthesizer in the promo video for “Lie for a Lie”, but it is unknown if he actually played on the recording. Also, he has said that he took some failed piano and violin lessons as a child.

Mason has done some work with other people, notably as a drummer and producer for Steve HillageRobert Wyatt (with whom he appeared on Top of the Pops[5]), The Damned and Gong.[6] He also drummed for Michael Mantler.[6]

Nick Mason used Premier drums in the 1960s and occasionally in the 1970s (mainly on recordings up to Wish You Were Here). After that, he used Ludwig drums from 1970 until 1992. He currently uses Drum Workshop (DW) drums, pedals and hardware. His kit is a DW double bass kit with the Dark Side of the Moon logo on the drums. He has also used Paiste cymbals during his entire career with Pink Floyd. He currently uses a mixture of Paiste Traditional, Signature and 2002 cymbals.

Mason’s book, Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd, was published in the UK in October 2004.[5] It is also available, abridged, as a 3CD audio book, read by Mason.[5] An updated edition was published, in paperback, in 2011.

He performed in the closing ceremony of the 2012 Olympic Games on 12 August 2012.

Nick Mason is also the Brother of the ex top gear television presenter Tony mason.

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Alan Cumming

From Wikipedia
Alan Cumming
Alan Cumming cropped.jpg

Cumming during the 2011 Fashion Week
Born 27 January 1965 (age 48)
Aberfeldy, Perthshire, Scotland
Nationality Dual British and American citizen
Occupation Actor, director, producer, writer
Years active 1980–present
Spouse(s) Hilary Lyon
(1985–1993)
Grant Shaffer
(2007–present)
Website
www.alancumming.com

Alan CummingOBE (born 27 January 1965), is a Scottish-American actor who has appeared in numerous films, television shows and plays.

His London stage appearances include Hamlet, the Maniac in Accidental Death of an Anarchist (for which he received an Olivier Award), the lead in Bent, and the National Theatre of Scotland‘s The Bacchae. On Broadway he has appeared in The Threepenny Opera, the master of ceremonies in Cabaret (for which he won a Tony Award), and Design for Living. Cumming also introduces Masterpiece Mystery! for PBS and appears on The Good Wife, for which he has been nominated for twoPrimetime Emmy Awards, two Screen Actors Guild Awards, and a Satellite Award.

He has also written a novel, Tommy’s Tale, had a cable talk show called Eavesdropping with Alan Cumming, and produced a line of perfumed products labelled “Cumming”. He has contributed opinion pieces to many publications and performed a cabaret show, I Bought A Blue Car Today. Cumming has also promoted LGBT rights, same-sex marriage, and sexual health charities.

Retaining his British citizenship, Cumming became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 2008.

Early life

Cumming was born in Aberfeldy, Perthshire, the son of Mary (née Darling), an insurance company secretary, and Alex Cumming, a forester. He has stated that his father was physically and emotionally abusive towards him.[1][2] He has one older brother, Tom, and a niece and two nephews. Brought up in Angus, Cumming attended Monikie Primary School and Carnoustie High School. Following graduation, he spent a year and a half employed as an editor and columnist for the pop and TV magazine TOPS before entering the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama in Glasgow. On graduation from Drama school, he married fellow student, Hilary Lyon; they divorced eight years later and had no children.

Film

Cumming made his film debut in Gillies MacKinnon‘s Passing Glory in 1986. His feature film debut came in 1992 when he starred alongside Sandrine Bonnaire and Bruno Ganz in Ian Sellar‘s Prague, which premiered at the Cannes Film Festival and earned him the Best Actor award at theAtlantic Film Festival and a Scottish BAFTA Best Actor nomination. American audiences first saw him playing the oleaginous Sean Walsh, an unwanted suitor of Minnie Driver‘s character, in Circle of Friends, an Irish film released in 1995. Also in 1995 he played Boris Ivanovich Grishenkoin the James Bond film GoldenEye.

His first film in the United States was 1997’s Romy and Michele’s High School Reunion, playing Sandy Frink opposite Lisa Kudrow and Mira Sorvino. Cumming co-wrote, co-directed, co-produced, and co-starred in the ensemble film The Anniversary Party with friend and former Cabaret co-star Jennifer Jason Leigh, in 2001.[3] The two starred in the film as a Hollywood couple. The film premiered at Cannes and garnered two Independent Spirit nominations and a National Board of Review award. He went on to star in and direct Suffering Man’s Charity, later released as Ghost Writer.

He had prominent roles in the Spy Kids trilogy, X-Men 2 (as Nightcrawler), Stanley Kubrick‘s Eyes Wide Shut and played Saturninus in the 1999 Julie Taymor film production of Titus. His many other films include Investigating SexJosie and the PussycatsEmmaGet CarterPlunkett and MacleaneSon of the MaskThe Flintstones in Viva Rock VegasFull Grown MenSpice WorldBurlesqueThe TempestBoogie Woogie and the animated films Garfield: The MovieJackboots on Whitehall and The Smurfs.

Earlier in his career, Cumming also directed two short films, Butter and Burn Your Phone. The latter began its life as a one-off drama on BBC Radio 4. He continues to direct short films and video pieces.

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Bridget Fonda

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